World Journal of Pharmaceutical and Medical Research (WJPMR) has indexed with various reputed international bodies like : Google Scholar , Index Copernicus , SOCOLAR, China , Indian Science Publications , Cosmos Impact Factor , Research Bible, Fuchu, Tokyo. JAPAN , Scientific Indexing Services (SIS) , UDLedge Science Citation Index , International Impact Factor Services , International Society for Research Activity (ISRA) Journal Impact Factor (JIF) , International Innovative Journal Impact Factor (IIJIF) , Scientific Journal Impact Factor (SJIF) , Global Impact Factor (In Process) , Digital Online Identifier-Database System (DOI-DS) , Science Library Index, Dubai, United Arab Emirates , Eurasian Scientific Journal Index (ESJI) , International Scientific Indexing, (ISI) UAE , IFSIJ Measure of Journal Quality , Web of Science Group (Under Process) , Directory of Research Journals Indexing , Scholar Article Journal Index (SAJI) , International Scientific Indexing ( ISI ) , 

World Journal of Pharmaceutical
and Medical Research

( An ISO 9001:2015 Certified International Journal )

An International Peer Reviewed Journal for Pharmaceutical and Medical Research and Technology
An Official Publication of Society for Advance Healthcare Research (Reg. No. : 01/01/01/31674/16)
ISSN 2455-3301
IMPACT FACTOR: 5.922

ICV : 78.6

Abstract

RHABDOMYOLYSIS: A DEMON THAT KILLS MUSCLE STRENGTH SILENTLY

*Kushal Nandi, Dr. Dhrubo Jyoti Sen and Dr. Dhananjoy Saha

ABSTRACT

Rhabdomyolysis is a condition in which damaged skeletal muscle breaks down rapidly. Symptoms may include muscle pains, weakness, vomiting, and confusion. There may be tea-colored urine or an irregular heartbeat. Some of the muscle breakdown products, such as the protein myoglobin, are harmful to the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure. The muscle damage is most often the result of a crush injury, strenuous exercise, medications, or drug abuse. Other causes include infections, electrical injury, heat stroke, prolonged immobilization, lack of blood flow to a limb, or snake bites. Some people have inherited muscle conditions that increase the risk of rhabdomyolysis. The diagnosis is supported by a urine test strip which is positive for "blood" but the urine contains no red blood cells when examined with a microscope. Blood tests show a creatine kinase greater than 1,000 U/L, with severe disease being above 5,000 U/L. The mainstay of treatment is large quantities of intravenous fluids. Other treatments may include dialysis or hemofiltration in more severe cases. Once urine output is established sodium bicarbonate and mannitol are commonly used but they are poorly supported by the evidence. Outcomes are generally good if treated early. Complications may include high blood potassium, low blood calcium, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and compartment syndrome. Rhabdomyolysis occurs in about 26,000 people a year in the United States. While the condition has been commented on throughout history, the first modern description was following an earthquake in 1908. Important discoveries as to its mechanism were made during the Blitz of London in 1941. It is a significant problem for those injured in earthquakes, and relief efforts for such disasters often include medical teams equipped to treat survivors with rhabdomyolysis.

[Full Text Article]

Powered By WJPMR | All Right Reserved

WJPMR